Rare Immunology News

Disease Profile

Loeys-Dietz syndrome type 2

Prevalence
Prevalence estimates on Rare Medical Network websites are calculated based on data available from numerous sources, including US and European government statistics, the NIH, Orphanet, and published epidemiologic studies. Rare disease population data is recognized to be highly variable, and based on a wide variety of source data and methodologies, so the prevalence data on this site should be assumed to be estimated and cannot be considered to be absolutely correct.

Unknown

Age of onset

#N/A

ICD-10

#N/A

Inheritance

Autosomal dominant A pathogenic variant in only one gene copy in each cell is sufficient to cause an autosomal dominant disease

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Autosomal recessive Pathogenic variants in both copies of each gene of the chromosome are needed to cause an autosomal recessive disease and observe the mutant phenotype

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X-linked
dominant X-linked dominant inheritance, sometimes referred to as X-linked dominance, is a mode of genetic inheritance by which a dominant gene is carried on the X chromosome.

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X-linked
recessive Pathogenic variants in both copies of a gene on the X chromosome cause an X-linked recessive disorder

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Mitochondrial or multigenic Mitochondrial genetic disorders can be caused by changes (mutations) in either the mitochondrial DNA or nuclear DNA that lead to dysfunction of the mitochondria and inadequate production of energy.

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Multigenic or multifactor Inheritance involving many factors, of which at least one is genetic but none is of overwhelming importance, as in the causation of a disease by multiple genetic and environmental factors.

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Not applicable

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Other names (AKA)

Loeys-Dietz syndrome 2

Categories

Blood Diseases; Congenital and Genetic Diseases; Heart Diseases;

Symptoms

This table lists symptoms that people with this disease may have. For most diseases, symptoms will vary from person to person. People with the same disease may not have all the symptoms listed. This information comes from a database called the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) . The HPO collects information on symptoms that have been described in medical resources. The HPO is updated regularly. Use the HPO ID to access more in-depth information about a symptom.

Medical Terms Other Names
Learn More:
HPO ID
5%-29% of people have these symptoms
Absent distal phalanges
Absent outermost digital bones
0005807
Arnold-Chiari malformation
0002308
Atrial septal defect
An opening in the wall separating the top two chambers of the heart
Hole in heart wall separating two upper heart chambers

[ more ]

0001631
Bicuspid aortic valve
Aortic valve has two leaflets rather than three
0001647
Bicuspid pulmonary valve
0005182
Craniosynostosis
0001363
Descending thoracic aorta aneurysm
0004959
Dilatation of the cerebral artery
0004944
Disproportionate tall stature
0001519
Global developmental delay
0001263
Hydrocephalus
Too much cerebrospinal fluid in the brain
0000238
Inguinal hernia
0000023
Intellectual disability
Mental deficiency
Mental retardation
Mental retardation, nonspecific
Mental-retardation

[ more ]

0001249
Mitral valve prolapse
0001634
Osteoporosis
0000939
Polydactyly
More than five fingers or toes on hands or feet
0010442
Postaxial polydactyly
0100259
Syndactyly
Webbed fingers or toes
0001159
Umbilical hernia
0001537
Percent of people who have these symptoms is not available through HPO
Arachnodactyly
Long slender fingers
Spider fingers

[ more ]

0001166
Ascending aortic dissection
0004933
Ascending tubular aorta aneurysm
Bulging of wall of large artery located above heart
0004970
Autosomal dominant inheritance
0000006
Bifid uvula
0000193
Blue sclerae
Whites of eyes are a bluish-gray color
0000592
Brachydactyly
Short fingers or toes
0001156
Camptodactyly
Permanent flexion of the finger or toe
0012385
Dermal translucency
0010648
Eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus
0410151
Exotropia
Outward facing eye ball
0000577
Generalized arterial tortuosity
Generalized twisted arteries
0004955
Hypertelorism
Wide-set eyes
Widely spaced eyes

[ more ]

0000316
Joint contracture of the hand
0009473
Joint laxity
Joint instability
Lax joints
Loose-jointedness
Loosejointedness

[ more ]

0001388
Malar flattening
Zygomatic flattening
0000272
Micrognathia
Little lower jaw
Small jaw
Small lower jaw

[ more ]

0000347
Patent ductus arteriosus
0001643
Pectus carinatum
Pigeon chest
0000768
Pectus excavatum
Funnel chest
0000767
Pes planus
Flat feet
Flat foot

[ more ]

0001763
Proptosis
Bulging eye
Eyeballs bulging out
Prominent eyes
Prominent globes
Protruding eyes

[ more ]

0000520
Protrusio acetabuli
0003179
Pulmonary artery aneurysm
0004937
Retrognathia
Receding chin
Receding lower jaw
Weak chin
Weak jaw

[ more ]

0000278
Scoliosis
0002650
Spondylolisthesis
Displacement of one backbone compared to another
Slipped backbone

[ more ]

0003302
Spontaneous pneumothorax
Spontaneous collapsed lung
0002108
Striae distensae
Stretch marks
0001065
Talipes equinovarus
Club feet
Club foot
Clubfeet
Clubfoot

[ more ]

0001762

Diagnosis

Making a diagnosis for a genetic or rare disease can often be challenging. Healthcare professionals typically look at a person’s medical history, symptoms, physical exam, and laboratory test results in order to make a diagnosis. The following resources provide information relating to diagnosis and testing for this condition. If you have questions about getting a diagnosis, you should contact a healthcare professional.

Testing Resources

  • The Genetic Testing Registry (GTR) provides information about the genetic tests for this condition. The intended audience for the GTR is health care providers and researchers. Patients and consumers with specific questions about a genetic test should contact a health care provider or a genetics professional.

    Organizations

    Support and advocacy groups can help you connect with other patients and families, and they can provide valuable services. Many develop patient-centered information and are the driving force behind research for better treatments and possible cures. They can direct you to research, resources, and services. Many organizations also have experts who serve as medical advisors or provide lists of doctors/clinics. Visit the group’s website or contact them to learn about the services they offer. Inclusion on this list is not an endorsement by GARD.

    Organizations Supporting this Disease

      Learn more

      These resources provide more information about this condition or associated symptoms. The in-depth resources contain medical and scientific language that may be hard to understand. You may want to review these resources with a medical professional.

      Where to Start

      • Johns Hopkins has information on Loeys-Dietz syndrome on their Web site. You can click on the link to view this information page.
      • The National Marfan Foundation has information on Loeys-Dietz syndrome on their Web site. You can click on the link to view this information page.
      • Loeys-Dietz Syndrome Foundation is a non-profit advocacy organization for this condition, and they provide medical information on their website.
      • Genetics Home Reference (GHR) contains information on Loeys-Dietz syndrome type 2. This website is maintained by the National Library of Medicine.

        In-Depth Information

        • GeneReviews provides current, expert-authored, peer-reviewed, full-text articles describing the application of genetic testing to the diagnosis, management, and genetic counseling of patients with specific inherited conditions.
        • The Monarch Initiative brings together data about this condition from humans and other species to help physicians and biomedical researchers. Monarch’s tools are designed to make it easier to compare the signs and symptoms (phenotypes) of different diseases and discover common features. This initiative is a collaboration between several academic institutions across the world and is funded by the National Institutes of Health. Visit the website to explore the biology of this condition.
        • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. Each entry has a summary of related medical articles. It is meant for health care professionals and researchers. OMIM is maintained by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. 
        • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Loeys-Dietz syndrome type 2. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.